v1.8 release out

This is a pretty small update, mostly as a checkpoint to some internal refactoring happening.

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.8

What’s inside this release?

The matching Pi 3 release is https://github.com/pftf/RPi3/releases/tag/v1.21

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

Guide – Windows 10 ARM64 on Pi 4B

So you want to install Windows 10 on this ‘Berry. You better follow this guide closely.

All 5 usb ports work now. 1 type C and 4 type A however drivers for type c port requires 1GB RAM limitation.

Hardware needed

  • A PC with recent Windows 10 build installed.
  • USB mouse and keyboard.
  • USB storage device.
  • Raspberry Pi 4B,
  • Micro HDMI cable.
  • Power supply (5V 3A+).

or if you still want to use sdcard for boot then you should also get

  • A fast micro SD card – 16GB or higher – Class A1 or A2
  • Micro SD card reader

Downloads

Download Windows 10 installation files for arm64 from https://uup.rg-adguard.net/.

  • Download ISO compiler in OneClick!
  • Run downloaded CMD-file (run creatingISO.cmd file).

Or, download via https://uupdump.ml/, using aria2 and convert, running aria2_download_windows.cmd after extracting it.

Either of those services will help you to generate a ISO file but we only need install.wim file from sources folder on the ISO. Any build that passes OOBE without issues will be fine.

WoR (windows on raspberry) -Download 2.0.0 from https://worproject.ml/downloads

Guide

Once you download all of the things above you can proceed.

Open WoR. Select Disk from the list which will be your microsd card reader or usb storage device and select Raspberry pi 4 as a device that you will use. Then select build of windows WoR should use by pointing to a correct install.wim file. Use the latest drivers that WoR server provides. Select the latest UEFI for Raspberry pi 4 in WoR. Use Advanced tab in WoR to limit memory to 1024MB for USB type-c and if you don’t need type-c port then RAM is still limited by UEFI by default to 3GB of RAM. Do edit boot options in WoR if you need to (I always overclock as my Pi has a fan and heatsink attached).

WoR will deploy windows to the selected micro sd card or usb storage device which will take from 10 minutes to 3 hours depending on speed of your micro SD card or USB storage device .

Safely remove micro SD card or usb storage device and move it into the Raspberry Pi.

Notes

This guide will be most likely updated if anything changes. First boot will take between 6 minutes to 2 hours depending on speed of your micro SD card or usb storage device . If there are issues during OOBE setup pressing shift + F10 then typing

%windir%\System32\Sysprep\sysprep.exe /oobe /reboot 

might help. If it doesn’t, you will need to test a different build of Windows 10 arm64. Good luck!

Drivers

Currently a lot of drivers are missing and not a lot of development is happening. We are missing drivers for audio jack, bluetooth ,wifi and gpu. Development of audio jack drivers is most likely to happen soon. Ethernet driver only loads on 19041 build of Windows 10.

Support

I freqently check comments under this post but for a bit faster response you can join Discord server and ask for help there as most people in that server will be able to answer your question. You might find there customised windows10 build (smaller and lighter).

v1.7 – yes, only a day after v1.6.

I hadn’t even finished writing up the 1.6 related artifacts when Pete pushed the button on the new release. Huge thanks both to Pete for getting this out there so soon and to Ard Biesheuvel for reviewing and approving the edk2-platforms fixes.

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.7

What’s inside this release?

The ACPI fixes will mean improved hardware support in OSes, although today that mostly means improved NetBSD support. We definitely need some volunteers to help with enabling Pi 4 support with ACPI in upstream Linux – see the issue tracker.

Big shout-out to Jeremy Linton for the PPTT implementation (Processor Properties Topology Table) – a new ACPI 6.3 table describing the relation between CPUs and caches. Yes, that’s not a typo – our PPTT is the 2nd revision variant introduced in ACPI 6.3, whereas PPTT was first introduced in 6.2.

Note: the matching Pi 3 UEFI release (v1.19) combines the fixes for the Pi 4 v1.6 and v1.7 releases.

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

v1.6 out

A few more goodies…

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.6

What’s inside this release?

Biggest change here is that your Pi will now boot at the default (Pi Foundation-recommended) frequency, instead of the 600MHz minimum. One less configuration option to change on every upgrade!

IMPORTANT: HTTP(S) boot, like PXE and iSCSI, will not currently work with the internal network card, because the GENET driver has not been upstreamed yet. This means you need a supported USB interface (Ax88772b) to use this feature.

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

More GENET work

Our UEFI firmware already supports certain USB-based network adapters for network booting (or other purposes), but that requires an additional adapter, which becomes even more awkward if you want to use a PoE HAT. NetBSD Arm platform guru Jared McNeill has been working on something, that Pi 4 UEFI users are going to find pretty cool. Dongle-less PXE and iSCSI is coming to a Pi 4 near you, because we’re getting native support for GENET networking soon! 😍🔥

This is being implemented as a Simple Network Protocol driver, so it will be usable by any UEFI driver or application.

v1.5 release available

A quick follow-up to v1.4, this release brings some important fixes.

Don’t stop me now (’cause I’m having a good time)
Don’t stop me now (yes, I’m havin’ a good time)
I don’t want to stop at all

Queen – Jazz

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.5

What’s inside this release?

This release mostly improves on the logic added to v1.4 release for switching between 3GB/4GB modes on the 4GB Pi 4.

Now, when you have 3GiB mode selected (which is the default), you will see 3GiB being reflected in the UEFI setup screen.

The fix for external .dtb is worth diving into. Many of our readers will know, that Raspberries traditionally boot operating systems with Device Tree, instead of ACPI. A dated overview can be found on the official Pi site. Long story short, if you want to boot an 64-bit Linux, NetBSD or FreeBSD today on the Pi with full I/O support, you still need the Device Tree that the VPU firmware prepares based on your config.txt settings (dtparams, overlays, etc).

The Pi 4 support for Device Tree is exactly like the Pi 3 support. At the time, UEFI relied on the Device Tree being placed in RAM after the UEFI image itself, basically overlaying itself on a section of the UEFI image. Recently, new VideoCore firmware broke this approach (which I really shouldn’t have come up with in the first place!) by switching the load ordering – now the Device Tree was loaded before the UEFI image, and since the two images overlapped, the Device Tree blob was getting overwritten. You can read more about it here and here. Anyway, it’s fixed now. The same fix needs to be made to the Pi 3 build. That’s still TBD.

If you want to boot an OS using Device Tree, don’t forget to enable it. By default the Pi 4 will boot in ACPI mode.

Be mindful that the fix involved changing the load address for the Device Tree in a way that wouldn’t overlap the UEFI image. The new values are:

  • device_tree_address=0x1f0000
  • device_tree_end=0x200000

While looking at the above regression, we were also able to regain 2MiB of memory, as the Trusted Firmware footprint for Pi 4 is much smaller than on the Pi 3.

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

v1.4 release already out

Pete’s on a roll! Some significant improvements have landed in the latest and greatest release.

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.4

What’s inside this release?

Assuming you have a 4GiB Pi, you can now boot with with the entire 4GiB available if you run NetBSD-current (generic 64-bit image), which already supports the ACPI interfaces required to make the Pi USB3 controller work with the full 4GiB RAM. Those living on the edge can try this Linux patch.

Note: upstreaming the Linux patch would be a great way to help this project.

Additionally, there’s been some improvements to the setup option layout:

Reorder forms in the order they are most likely to be queried.
Rename Chipset Configuration, making CPU settings more prominent.
New Advanced Configuration. 3GB limit setting is grayed out on 1GB/2GB boards.
Grouping all SD/MMC settings together.

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

v1.3 release

This is a minor follow-up to v1.2 for Pi 4, intended to do some soak testing on the ongoing ACPI clean-up and factorization changes.

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.3

What’s inside this release?

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

V1.2 RELEASE IS OUT!

Hot on the heels of v1.1, Pete has a new release for you.

https://github.com/pftf/RPi4/releases/tag/v1.2

What’s inside this release?

It may not look like much, but it provides a radically improved networking experience, courtesy of a heads up by Jared and his recent work on the NetBSD GENET driver.

Of course what use is improved GENET via ACPI, when there is barely an OS support? Well, courtesy of the amazing work done by Pete and Jeremy Linton, the Linux ACPI patch for GENET has been merged into net-next.

As always, read the release notes and usual caveats.

BSD-licensed GENET code!

NetBSD’s amazing Jared McNeill, who appears to crank out Arm platform support code for NetBSD at an inhuman rate, has coded up a driver for the on-board gigabit NIC (aka GENET).

While a great milestone for NetBSD, this is also the world’s first BSD-licensed implementation of a GENET driver. For our UEFI development effort, this finally means being able to implement a proper UEFI driver for the on-board NIC for PXE booting, iSCSI…you name it.

The NetBSD driver already supports the ACPI bindings for GENET, which first appeared in our 1.1 release, and its development is providing great feedback on further evolving the ACPI support. See, the MAC address is not stored in the NIC itself, but comes from the outside (via mailbox interface, I’m guessing via OTP). Of course, you can hypothetically read it from the NIC itself, if it’s been initialized. But apparently that only works if the NIC has been taken out of reset and the MAC is programmed. NetBSD today can boot 3 ways on the Pi 4 – TianoCore UEFI, U-Boot and “straight up” via config.txt. For booting via UEFI, the NIC is taken out of reset and the MAC is programmed. For others, the MAC is not programmed or the NIC is not taken out of reset, making it unsafe to try and read the MAC address, so there needs to be a more reliable mechanism. This might mean a local-mac-address _DSD property is in order for best compatibility. Having to fall back to the VPU mailbox interface in ACPI mode is a no-go: that would amount to Pi-specific platform knowledge and definitely be not SBBR. Another angle to consider is operating systems performing a fast reboot (aka kexec on Linux) – it would be totally unexpected to see a MAC address change to leak across kexec, so that’s another reason for persisting via an ACPI property.

Stepping back, I want to extend a huge thanks to Jared for both his feedback and for his work on supporting our firmware. NetBSD today is the most advanced OS to boot on the Pi 4B SBBR-way: networking, xHCI, 4GB boards, SD card, etc. Once we get the new SDHCI controller (MMC2) described in ACPI and working this should also bring in Wi-Fi. Jared reports that the existing Arasan driver could be sufficient to support MMC2 – that is to say, the old Arasan SDHCI controller’s set of quirks appears to be a direct superset – at least on NetBSD. 🤣

NetBSD also is the only OS today to fully support ACPI _DMA descriptors for describing DMA translations/constraints. This is very important for supporting Pi and Pi-like platforms via straight-up ACPI and without platform DMA quirks. If you like what you’re seeing with NetBSD and Arm support, consider supporting the NetBSD Foundation.